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condensed episode (45 minutes):

EPISODE 163: CHRIS AIMONE

CHRIS AIMONE - FROM ELECTRIC EYEWEAR TO BRAIN SENSING HEADBANDS THAT HELP YOU MEDITATE

About the Episode:

In episode #163 of Untangle, Ariel Garten dives inside the head of Chris Aimone. Chris is in many ways the spiritual and technical genius behind InteraXon's tech. It’s an honour for Ariel to have him as a friend and collaborator, and in the episode they reminisce on their different versions of the crazy ride they’ve been on, hear his spiritual perspective, and learn about how he built google glass, amongst other inventions, before google did. And of course, how technology can help us better understand our mind and ourselves. 

About Chris Aimone:

Chris Aimone co-founded Interaxon with a mission to create technology that can support and guide our quest for peace and wellbeing. An inventor at heart, Chris’s creative and design practice has spanned many fields, including architecture, alternative energy, augmented reality, imaging, music and robotics, fueled by a masters-level education in engineering science and computer science at the University of Toronto. Chris has built installations for the Ontario Science Centre and contributed to major technology art projects featured around the world (including Burning Man). Chris’s science education and lifetime of mind-body practices informed his creation of the Muse brain-sensing headband.

Before Interaxon,  Chris spent a decade working with Dr. Steve Mann exploring human-centric and transformative technology. Together they pushed the limits of cybernetic wearables,  brain computer interfaces and augmented reality, developing early prototypes of technologies that now support several successful start-ups. They also founded a musical instrument company,  producing the world’s first water-based organs, or “hydraulophones,” which have been installed at science museums and splash parks around the world.